Traprock Peace Center www.traprockpeace.org

November 7, 2005: Five reasonable women from Massachusetts approached the Entergy Nuclear office, on Old Ferry Road in Brattleboro, Vermont with urgent appeals for relief from the health effects of ionizing radiation. Sally Shaw of Gill, Nina Keller of New Salem, Sunny Miller of Deerfield, Lynn Crough of Greenfield and Maure Briggs-Carrington of Montague. All five are mothers and three are grandmothers.Rob Williams, spokesperson for Entergy said they would not meet with the women at their headquarters. All five made comments, regarding thyroid problems, cancers, miscarriages, Downs Syndrome, immune deficiencies and heart disease known, to be caused by ingesting or inhaling contaminants from reactors. They urged replacement of nuclear energy production with sustainable production and energy efficiency measures, to end production of nuclear wastes which they say will be a burden to their children and future generations. Two Vermont women, Terry Carter and Elizabeth Wood joined the group approaching Entergy Nuclear managers. All seven women were met by police, who turned them away and cited them for unlawful trespass, with arraignment set for 8:30 on Tuesday, November 13 in Brattleboro.

Downwind health effects, radiation monitoring, the inadequacies of evacuation plans, the particular hazards of the proposed 20% uprate at New England's oldest reactor, in Vernon, Vermont, and healing and recovery are the focus of a conference at Greenfield Community College on Saturday, December 10, 12:30-6:30. Sally Shaw of Gill, is an ecologist who lives with her family just 8 miles from the reactor. Shaw's signs said, "My child deserves a helthy future" and "I want my thyroid back." Three of the Massachusets women have thyroid conditions. Shaw has attended numerous hearings to present comments. She points out that the Department of Health in Massachusetts does no radiological monitoring of air, water, plants, milk, fish or meat in western Massachusetts, even though Vermont testing shows elevated levels of cesium-137 and cobalt-60 in Connecticut River sediments. Shaw recommends a google search in the Federal Register, which reveals that Entergy has requested and obtained from teh Nuclear Regulatory Commission a permanent exemption from steam leakage test requirements.

Sunny Miller, Executive Director of Traprock Peace Center went to the headquarters to attempt a meeting with Entergy officials and deliver a letter asking for radiation monitors in a 50-mile radius of the reactor. More than a decade ago, Miller was one of three Traprock volunteers from North Adams and Williamstown, Mass, who organized a conference at Greenfield Community College to bring neighbors together with experts concerning the oldest operating reactor in the country in Rowe, Massachusetts. "Experts like Bob Pollard, of the Union of Concerned Scientists, gave us alarming information on embrittlement. Pollard was an engineer who left employment at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission because they wouldn't enforce their own regulations. I know we can prevent the increased risks of this uprate. Public scrutiny, individual initiative, generous donations and expertise worked, and will work, to prevent license extensions at old reactors. We need neighbors to speak up. We know the federal government isn't ready or able to protect us, or manage an evacuation."


12/6/05
Sally Shaw, 413-863-4992 and Sunny Miller, 413-773-7427

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