grassrootspeace.org

November 2, 2007: This website is maintained by Charles Jenks, who created it 10 years ago and has authored all of its web pages and nearly all of its multimedia content (photographs, audio, video, and pdf files). As the author and registered owner of this site, his purpose is to preserve an important slice of the history of the grassroots peace movement in the US over the past decade. He is maintaining this historical archive as a service to the greater peace movement, and to the many friends of Traprock Peace Center. Blogs have been consolidated and the calendar has been archived for security reasons; all other links remain the same, and virtually all blog content remains intact.

THIS SITE NO LONGER REFLECTS THE CURRENT AND ONGOING WORK OF TRAPROCK PEACE CENTER, which has reorganized its board and moved to Greenfield, Mass. To contact Traprock Peace Center, call 413-773-7427 or visit its site. Charles Jenks is posting new material to PeaceJournal.org, a multimedia blog and resource center.

War on Truth  From Warriors to Resisters
Books of the Month

The War on Truth

From Warriors to Resisters

Army of None

Iraq: the Logic of Withdrawal

Thanks to Michael Klare, for sharing this. Michael T. Klare is a professor of peace and world security studies at Hampshire College in Amherst, Mass., and the author of Resource Wars: The New Landscape of Global Conflict (Owl Books / Henry Holt).

Council for a Livable World February 18, 2003

USEFUL QUOTES FROM FEBRUARY 11 INTELLIGENCE AGENCIES TESTIMONY

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Most immediate threat to U.S.: terrorism (not Iraq)
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Robert S. Mueller, III, Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation, February 11, 2003, Senate Select Committee on Intelligence "The al-Qaeda network will remain for the foreseeable future the most immediate and serious threat facing this country . . . Despite the progress the US has made in disrupting the al-Qaeda network overseas and within our own country, the organization maintains the ability and the intent to inflict significant casualties in the US with little warning."

Vice Admiral Lowell E. Jacoby, USN, Director, Defense Intelligence Agency, February 11, 2003, Senate Select Committee on Intelligence "Despite our significant successes to date, terrorism remains the most immediate threat to U.S. interests at home and abroad. A number of terrorist groups - including the FARC in Colombia, various Palestinian organizations, and Lebanese Hizballah - have the capability to do us harm. But I am most concerned about the al-Qaida network."

Carl W. Ford, Jr., Assistant Secretary of State for Intelligence and Research, Department of State February 11, 2003, Senate Select Committee on Intelligence "Al-Qaida continues to pose the most immediate and dangerous threat of attack against the US homeland and against Americans and American interests around the world. This is so despite its having taken heavy hits as a result of worldwide counterterrorism efforts."

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Iraq does not have nuclear weapons today
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Vice Admiral Lowell E. Jacoby, USN, Director, Defense Intelligence Agency, February 11, 2003, Senate Select Committee on Intelligence "Iran and Iraq have active nuclear programs and could have nuclear weapons within the decade."

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Iraq likely to use WMD if regime in jeopardy
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Vice Admiral Lowell E. Jacoby, USN, Director, Defense Intelligence Agency, February 12, 2003, Senate Armed Services Committee "We do not know Saddam Hussein‚s doctrine of WMD usage. We assess, however, based on his past patterns and availability of weapons in his inventory, that he will in fact employ them. And the assessment is that he will employ them when he makes the decision that the regime is in jeopardy."Follow-up question from Sen. Carl Levin: "Do you agree, Mr. Tenet, with what Admiral Jacoby just said?" Response from George Tenet: "Yes."

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North Korean ICBM threat to U.S. by 2015, not today
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Vice Admiral Lowell E. Jacoby, USN, Director, Defense Intelligence Agency, February 11, 2003, Senate Select Committee on Intelligence "In addition to existing Russian and Chinese capabilities, by 2015 the U.S. will likely face new ICBM threats from North Korea, Iran, and possibly Iraq."

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International concerns over perceived ŒU.S. unilateralism‚
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Vice Admiral Lowell E. Jacoby, USN, Director, Defense Intelligence Agency, February 11, 2003, Senate Select Committee on Intelligence "Much of the world is increasingly apprehensive about U.S. power and influence. Many are concerned about the expansion, consolidation, and dominance of American values, ideals, culture, and institutions. Reactions to this sensitivity to growing 'Americanization' can range from mild 'chafing' on the part of our friends and allies, to fear and violent rejection on the part of our adversaries. We should consider that these perceptions, mixed with angst over perceived 'U.S. unilateralism' will give rise to significant anti-American behavior."

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Global military spending down 50% (US way up)
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Vice Admiral Lowell E. Jacoby, USN, Director, Defense Intelligence Agency, February 11, 2003, Senate Select Committee on Intelligence "Global defense spending has dropped 50% during the past decade and, with the exception of some parts of Asia, is likely to remain limited. This trend will have multiple impacts. First, both adversaries and allies will not keep pace with the U.S. military. This drives foes toward 'asymmetric options,' widens the capability gap between U.S. and allied forces, and increases the demand on unique U.S. force capabilities."

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Worldwide poverty breeds extremism
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Vice Admiral Lowell E. Jacoby, USN, Director, Defense Intelligence Agency, February 11, 2003, Senate Select Committee on Intelligence "Increasing numbers of people in need. A host of factors - some outlined above - have combined to increase the numbers of people facing deepening economic stagnation, political instability, and cultural alienation. These conditions provide fertile ground for extremism. Their frustration is increasingly directed at the U.S. and the West."

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Analysis of homeland security threat
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Vice Admiral Lowell E. Jacoby, USN, Director, Defense Intelligence Agency, February 11, 2003, Senate Select Committee on Intelligence "Many adversaries believe the best way to avoid, deter, or offset U.S. power is to develop a capability to threaten the U.S. homeland. In addition to the traditional threat from strategic nuclear missiles, our national infrastructure is vulnerable to physical and computer attack. The interdependent nature of the infrastructure creates more vulnerability, because attacks against one sector - the electric power grid for instance - would impact other sectors as well. Many defense-related critical infrastructures are vulnerable to a wide range of attacks, especially those that rely on commercial sector elements with multiple, single points of failure. Foreign states have the greatest attack potential (in terms of resources and capabilities), but the most immediate and serious threat today is from terrorists carrying out well-coordinated strikes against selected critical nodes. Al-Qaida has spoken openly of targeting the U.S. economy as a way of undermining our global power and uses publicly available Internet web sites to reconnoiter American infrastructure, utilities, and critical facilities."

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Proliferation threat growing
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Vice Admiral Lowell E. Jacoby, USN, Director, Defense Intelligence Agency, February 11, 2003, Senate Select Committee on Intelligence „The long-term trends with respect to WMD and missile proliferation are bleak. States seek these capabilities for regional purposes, or to provide a hedge to deter or offset U.S. military superiority. Terrorists seek greater physical and psychological impacts. The perceived 'need to acquire' is intense and, unfortunately, globalization provides a more amenable proliferation environment. Much of the technology and many of the raw materials are readily available. New alliances have formed, pooling resources for developing these capabilities, while technological advances and global economic conditions make it easier to transfer materiel and expertise. The basic sciences are widely understood, although the complex engineering tasks required to produce an effective weapons capability are not achieved easily. Some 25 countries possess or are actively pursuing WMD or missile programs. The threat to U.S. and allied interests will grow during the next decade.‰

George Tenet, Director, Central Intelligence Agency, February 11, 2003, Senate Intelligence Committee

"More has changed on nuclear proliferation over the past year than on any other issue. For 60 years, weapon-design information and technologies for producing fissile material˜the key hurdles for nuclear weapons production˜have been the domain of only a few states. These states, though a variety of self-regulating and treaty based regimes, generally limited the spread of these data and technologies.

In my view, we have entered a new world of proliferation. In the vanguard of this new world are knowledgeable non-state purveyors of WMD materials and technology. Such non-state outlets are increasingly capable of providing technology and equipment that previously could only be supplied by countries with established capabilities.

This is taking place side by side with the continued weakening of the international nonproliferation consensus. Control regimes like the Non-Proliferation Treaty are being battered by developments such as North Korea's withdrawal from the NPT and its open repudiation of other agreements.

==The example of new nuclear states that seem able to deter threats from more powerful states, simply by brandishing nuclear weaponry, will resonate deeply among other countries that want to enter the nuclear weapons club.

Demand creates the market. The desire for nuclear weapons is on the upsurge. Additional countries may decide to seek nuclear weapons as it becomes clear their neighbors and regional rivals are already doing so. The "domino theory" of the 21st century may well be nuclear."

John Isaacs
Council for a Livable World
110 Maryland Avenue, NE - Room 409
Washington, D.C. 20002
(202) 543-4100 x.131
www.clw.org

Page created February 26, 2003 by Charlie Jenks