grassrootspeace.org

November 5, 2007: This website is an archive of the former website, traprockpeace.org, which was created 10 years ago by Charles Jenks. It became one of the most populace sites in the US, and an important resource on the antiwar movement, student activism, 'depleted' uranium and other topics. Jenks authored virtually all of its web pages and multimedia content (photographs, audio, video, and pdf files. As the author and registered owner of that site, his purpose here is to preserve an important slice of the history of the grassroots peace movement in the US over the past decade. He is maintaining this historical archive as a service to the greater peace movement, and to the many friends of Traprock Peace Center. Blogs have been consolidated and the calendar has been archived for security reasons; all other links remain the same, and virtually all blog content remains intact.

THIS SITE NO LONGER REFLECTS THE CURRENT AND ONGOING WORK OF TRAPROCK PEACE CENTER, which has reorganized its board and moved to Greenfield, Mass. To contact Traprock Peace Center, call 413-773-7427 or visit its site. Charles Jenks is posting new material to PeaceJournal.org, a multimedia blog and resource center.

War on Truth  From Warriors to Resisters
Books of the Month

The War on Truth

From Warriors to Resisters

Army of None

Iraq: the Logic of Withdrawal

March to Redeem the Soul of America - ExxonMobil War Boycott - "ExxonMobil: Return War Profits"

March to Redeem the Soul of America

 

Nick Mottern on ExxonMobil profiting from war on Iraq

Quicktime Video
Note the photos of ExxonMobil board members (19.43 mg - please allow time for download).
Replay requires Quicktime - free download for Mac and Windows.

Hadi Jawad, Crawford Peace House; Rev. Peter Johnson, Dallas; Nick Mottern, ExxonMobil War Boycott campaign; Rev. Roy Malveaux, Beaumont, TX
at beginning of March to Redeem the Soul of America outside ExxonMobil world headquarters in Irving, Texas. photo © 2006 Charles Jenks

NEW - Hear the roundtable, with stories of the Crawford Peace House and Rev. Peter Johnson's heartwarming and revealing stories of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. Rev. Johnson, as a young minister, was an assistant to Dr. King during civil rights campaigns. See Photo Album of marchers' roundtable reflections and remembrances on the April 4th anniversary of assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. Marchers and supporters gathered at a church in Waxahachie, Texas for dinner and fellowship after a day of marching. photo 2006 Charles Jenks

MP3 Audio - 1:53:01 length; 51.8 mb; 64 kbps mono. Audio is © 2006 Charles Jenks; all rights reserved. It may be replayed on radio with notice to charlesjenks@gmail.com and attribution.

March to Redeem the Soul of America responds to ExxonMobil Criticism - April 7, 2006

**********************************************************************
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
APRIL 6, 2006
CONTACTS: NICK MOTTERN – nickmottern@earthlink.net
VALLEY REED – valley.reed@earthlink.net
www.marchtoredeem.org
**********************************************************************
ExxonMobil Criticizes Anti-War Marchers But Fails To Respond to Boycott Arguments
Milford, Texas – Statement by Nick Mottern, March to Redeem the Soul of America:

“ In yesterday’s Waxahachie Daily Light we are criticized by Russ Roberts, ExxonMobil spokesperson as “living in a fantasy world”, but ExxonMobil has not responded to these major points:

*ExxonMobil has been involved with the Genesis of the Iraq war, and that it supports the war.
*ExxonMobil has collected the $7 billion out of it’s 36 billion record 2005 profit that it would not have, were there no war.
*ExxonMobil has a responsibility to turn that $7 billion back to the U.S. Global Society to meet emergency human needs, many of them traceable directly to ExxonMobil operations. ###

April 5th story on march, with criticizm by ExxonMobil, in The Daily Light, Waxahachie, Texas

The March to Redeem the Soul of America was launched with press conferences and marches in Irving, Texas on April 1 and Dallas on April 2, beginning a 120-mile walk that will arrive in Crawford, Texas on Thursday, April 13.

The unifying themes of speakers on the first two days was the need for citizens to begin to get control of the combine of government and major corporations - not only to stop the Iraq war, but to protect human rights and civil liberties. The March organizers and participants are asking communities to join their calls for an end to war profiteering and an end to the occupation of Iraq.

In Irving, people gathered outside ExxonMobil's world headquarters and called on the oil giant to work to end the Iraq war and to spend $7 billion in undeserved 2005 war profits to meet human needs related to the Iraq war and ExxonMobil operations. See the full statement on the beginning of the march below.

The march has been endorsed by peace worker Cindy Sheehan and historian Howard Zinn and a host of organizations, activists and writers.

[Audio may be downloaded for personal use or played by radio stations with notice to charlesjenks@gmail.com and attribution.

Audio and Photos

April 1 press conference at ExxonMobil Headquarters
MP3 audio - 51:07 minutes (23.5 mb); 64 kbps mono

See Photo Album

Nick Mottern on ExxonMobil profiting from war on Iraq

Quicktime Video - Note the photos of ExxonMobil board members (19.43 mg - please allow time for download). Replay requires Quicktime - free download for Mac and Windows.

Speakers - ExxonMobil Press Conference

Nick Mottern, Director, ConusmersforPeace.org ExxonMobil War Boycott campaign
Rev. Roy Malveaux, Beaumont, Texas
State Rep. Lon Burnam, Fort Worth
Maureen Haver, Jumpstart Ford Campaign
Hadi Jawad, Crawford Peace House and Dallas Peace Center
Rev. Peter Johnson, Dallas civil rights leader
Margarita Alvarez, United Voices for Immigrants
Judith Kaufman
Valley Reed, chief organizer, March to Redeem Campaign
Sunny Miller, Traprock Peace Center, lead a song "Step by Step"

Day 1 March by ExxonMobil Headquarters

Photos

Day 1 Post-March Fellowship and Impromptu Protest at ExxonMobil Station

Photos

April 2 Photos of the entire day's events

April 2 press conference in front of Dallas County Courthouse and Jail

MP3 audio - 31:38 minutes (14.5 mb); 64 kbps mono

Day 2 March from Jail to VA Hospital

Speakers - Courthouse and Jail, Dallas Press Conference
Valley Reed, chief organizer, March to Redeem Campaign
Nick Mottern, Director, ConusmersforPeace.org ExxonMobil War Boycott campaign
Joan Cobici, American Civil Liberties Union
Rev. Peter Johnson, Dallas civil rights leader
Hadi Jawad, Crawford Peace House and Dallas Peace Center
Beatriz Saldivar, Gold Star Families for Peace (her nephew was killed in Iraq)

April 2 press conference at the Dallas VA Hospital
MP3 audio - 51:32 minutes (23.6 mb); 64 kbps mono

Speakers - VA Hospital Press Conference
Rev. Diane Baker - Dallas Peace Center
Hadi Jawad, Crawford Peace House and Dallas Peace Center
John Fullenwider, High School teacher (speaking on the cost of war)
Michael McNeil, veteran of Desert Storm (Marine Corps) and member of Code Pink
Nick Mottern, Director, ConusmersforPeace.org ExxonMobil War Boycott campaign
Rev. Peter Johnson, Dallas civil rights leader
Jim Goodnow, Veterans for Peace
John Wolf, founder of Crawford Peace House
Valley Reed, chief organizer, March to Redeem Campaign
***
Drums Not Guns provided music for listening and dancing at the VA Hospital.
Members are Michael Kinney, Shell 'Happy' Weisman

Food Not Bombs provided food - thanks to Stephanie and Russ Frizell

 

 

 

March to Redeem the Soul of America Starts at ExxonMobil Headquarters

March to Redeem the Soul of America
Valley Reed, Chief Organizer, valley.reed@earthlink.net
http://www.marchtoredeem.org

ExxonMobil War Boycott
Nick Mottern, National Director, nickmottern@earthlink.net
http://www.consumersforpeace.org

The March to Redeem the Soul of America was launched with press conferences and marches in Irving, Texas on April 1 and Dallas on April 2, beginning a 120-mile walk that will arrive in Crawford, Texas on Thursday, April 13. The March will participate in "Easter in Crawford" - with President Bush planning to take his usual Easter vacation at his ranch - and the celebration of the third anniversary of the Crawford Peace House.

The unifying themes of speakers on the first two days was the need for citizens to begin to get control of the combine of government and major corporations - not only to stop the Iraq war, but to protect human rights and civil liberties. The March organizers and participants are asking communities to join their calls for an end to war profiteering and an end to the occupation of Iraq.

In Irving, people gathered outside ExxonMobil's world headquarters and called on the oil giant to work to end the Iraq war and to spend $7 billion in undeserved 2005 war profits to meet human needs related to the Iraq war and ExxonMobil operations. Speaking were Nick Mottern, Director, ConusmersforPeace.org and the ExxonMobil War Boycott campaign; Rev. Roy Malveaux, Beaumont, Texas; State Rep. Lon Burnam, Fort Worth; Maureen Haver, Jumpstart Ford Campaign; Hadi Jawad, Crawford Peace House and Dallas Peace Center; Rev. Peter Johnson, Dallas civil rights leader; Margarita Alvarez, United Voices for Immigrants; Judith Kaufman; and Valley Reed, chief organizer, March to Redeem Campaign. The AP covered the press conference; it's report was published by many newspapers.

Rev. Roy Malveaux from Beaumont Texas explained how ExxonMobil has rejected any responsibility for severe health problems in his community, located next to an ExxonMobil Refinery.

Sunny Miller, Traprock Peace Center, lead the song "Step by Step" as the press conference ended and the March began with people marching past ExxonMobil's main gate.

On April 2nd in Dallas, the march held a press conference outside the County Courthouse and Jail. Joan Cobici; American Civil Liberties Union and Beatriz Saldivar, Gold Star Families for Peace (her nephew was killed in Iraq) joined Reed, Mottern, Johnson and Jawad as speakers.

Beatrice Saldivar held a picture of her nephew killed in Iraq and a picture of Rex Tillerson, Chair and C.E.O. of Exxon Mobile, saying, "Do you think Mr. RexTillerson, the Chief and CEO of ExxonMobil will ever go to Iraq? Do you think he will ever put himself in a jail like this where they are putting our Hispanics and our African Americans."
Speakers at the Dallas Jail said money is needed for programs and jobs for young people to keep them out of jail. Money and management changes are also needed to deal with serious health problems, such as HIV and hepatitis, that are spread into the community when prisoners go home, according to Rev. Peter Johnson, Dallas civil rights activist. $3.3 billion in federal tax dollars has gone to the Iraq war from Dallas County alone, according to the National Priorities Project. Texas has spent $25.6 billion on the war.

Marchers then crossed the Trinity River and met again outside the VA Hospital. Marchers received an enthusiastic reception, with banners, drumming (provided by Drums not Guns) and food (courtesy of Food Not Bombs). Rev. Diane Baker, Dallas Peace Center; John Fullenwider, High School teacher (speaking on the cost of war); Michael McNeil, veteran of Desert Storm (Marine Corps) and member of Code Pink; Jim Goodnow, Veterans for Peace; and John Wolf, founder of Crawford Peace House added their voices.

Speakers addressed the need for quality medical and psychological services for veterans, and the under reporting of war casualties.
Nick Mottern, Director of Consumers for Peace, said the War Boycott is calling on ExxonMobil to give $630 million directly to the Veterans Administration to supply money for mental health care, prosthetics and catastrophic care. This is the amount in a supplemental appropriations bill that was blocked by House Republicans several weeks ago.

March 31, 2006 - Ralph Nader's Open letter to Rex Tillerson, Chair and CEO, ExxonMobil

AP Coverage: War protesters start march outside Exxon headquarters

April 2
by Angela K. Brown
Associated Press


IRVING - About 50 war protesters rallied outside Exxon Mobil Corp.'s headquarters Saturday, saying that $7 billion of its record 2005 profits was earned from the war with Iraq and should be paid to injured veterans and those with health problems living near refineries.

After chanting "Boycott Exxon! Stop the war!" the group marched down the street in the rain, with a police escort for safety reasons. Some held banners that read "Spare the innocents" and "No war for oil."

The rally kicked off the "March to Redeem the Soul of America" that is to end up about 120 miles away in Crawford near President Bush's ranch on Easter weekend.
"This two-week march is to bring attention to the sins of corporate America," said state Rep. Lon Burnam, D-Fort Worth, who also is the director of the Dallas Peace Center.

Mark Boudreaux, an Exxon Mobil spokesman, said the company was offended by the way such groups claim to represent the public's interest by making "inflammatory statements" that he said were "blatantly untrue."

"They're living in a fantasy world," Boudreaux said, adding that the company has donated $3.5 billion to charities the past several years.

He also said employees and retirees gave $60 million to charitable organizations and volunteered 800,000 hours last year. Irving-based Exxon Mobil, the world's largest publicly traded oil company, earned $36.13 billion last year, the highest ever for a U.S. company.

Economic studies show that about 20 percent of that profit can be attributed to the war that has sent oil prices soaring, said Nick Mottern, director of ConsumersforPeace.org.

He is compiling a list of people - including injured Iraq war veterans and Beaumont and Baytown residents with health problems living near Exxon refineries - who peace activists believe should receive some of Exxon's $7 billion.

Protesters plan to drive south to several cities, marching along part of the way each day, and will arrive the week of Easter in Crawford. There they will be joined by Cindy Sheehan, the California woman who camped in ditches near Bush's ranch last summer, demanding to ask him for what noble cause her soldier son died in Iraq in 2004. Two of his top aides met with Sheehan, but Bush never did.

Her August vigil galvanized the peace movement while drawing thousands of anti-war demonstrators to the tiny Texas town, but it also attracted scores of Bush supporters who said Sheehan was hurting troop morale.

Sheehan and a few hundred protesters returned to Crawford for a second protest the week of Thanksgiving while Bush again was at his ranch.

 

The call for ExxonMobil to spend $7 billion on meeting war-related and business-related human needs is based on the increasingly widely-held view that the conditions created by the Iraq War have contributed significantly to the dramatic profits of ExxonMobil and other major oil companies since the occupation began in 2003. For example, Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz and colleague, Linda Blimes, writing on the cost of the Iraq War, note that the war has had a major inflationary impact on oil prices, which in turn, has meant that “Profits of oil companies have increased enormously.”

Dean Baker, co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research, responding to an inquiry from ConsumersforPeace.org, estimates that as much as 20 percent of ExxonMobil’s record $36 billion 2005 profit, or about $7 billion, is “a ball park number” for what can be considered war profits for the oil giant. This is an estimate of the amount of profit that is essentially unearned and is traceable to oil prices that have been inflated because (1) the Iraq War has severely depressed Iraq oil production, and (2) there are fears that the Iraq War may spread, possibly affecting oil production in Iran and Saudi Arabia.

ConsumersforPeace.org is promoting the ExxonMobil War Boycott, which seeks immediate withdrawal of all U.S. forces and mercenaries from Iraq, reparations for Iraq, impeachment of George W. Bush and prosecution of U.S. officials for war crimes and crimes against humanity in Iraq.

“ExxonMobil has made at least $7 billion extra in 2005 because of the invasion and occupation of Iraq,” said Nick Mottern, director of ConsumersforPeace.org. “This is unearned money, taken from consumers, and it needs to be returned to society,” he continued. “We propose that ExxonMobil write checks to private organizations for relief in Iraq, for war-related injuries of U.S. veterans and to compensate people in the U.S. and elsewhere who have been harmed by ExxonMobil operations.” The beneficiaries would include residents of Beaumont and Baytown, Texas, living near ExxonMobil refineries who have experienced severe health problems, according to Mottern.

ConsumersforPeace.org is developing a list of potential recipients for the $7 billion.

“War profiteering is unacceptable in any war,” said Mottern, “and it is particularly despicable when it is done by the nation’s largest oil company during an illegal war that has so much suffering and has so much to do with oil.”

On April 4, in Waxahachie, Texas, the march will commemorate the 38th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. This is also the date in 2004 when Ms. Sheehan’s son was killed in Iraq; his body was returned to her on Palm Sunday.

Marched sponsored by:

Consumers for Peace - ConsumersForPeace.org
Dallas County Young Democrats
Campus Antiwar Network - UT Austin Chapter
Crawford Peace House
Dallas NAACP
Dallas Peace Center
The International Socialist Organization (ISO) - Austin Branch
Southern Christian Leadership Conference
Texans for Peace
Texas Peace Action


Endorsed by:

Organizations:

After Downing Street
Arise for Social Justice (MA)
Association of Humanitarian Lawyers
Bloomington Peace Action Coalition
Democrats.com
Campus Antiwar Network
Coalition Against War and Injustice (Baton Rouge)
Covington (Louisiana) Peace Project
Goldstar Families for Peace
International Socialist Organization
Midsouth Peace and Justice Center (Memphis)
Office of the Americas
Progressive Democrats of America
Traprock Peace Center
WESPAC Foundation

Individual Endorsers*:

Adam Roufberg, Natural Philosophers International

Ann Wright, Retired Colonel, US Army and Army Reserves; Former Deputy Chief of Mission, US Embassies, Afghanistan and Mongolia; President, Camp Casey Veterans for Peace

Annie and Buddy Spell, Louisiana peace activists (Annie is president of the Greater Covington, LA branch of the NAACP)

Anthony Arnove, author, "Iraq: the Logic of Withdrawal"; co-editor with Howard Zinn, "Voices of a People's History of the US"

Camilo Mejía, Staff Sgt., Florida National Guard, was the first soldier to go public with his refusal to redeploy. He spent seven months in military confinement for his decision. He is a member of Iraq Veterans Against the War - www.ivaw.net

Charles Jenks, J.D., Chair of Advisory Board - Traprock Peace Center

Cindy Sheehan, Co-founder - Gold Star Families for Peace

Dahr Jamail, independent journalist who spent over 8 months reporting from occupied Iraq

Dallas County Young Democrats Dallas NAACP Dallas Peace Center Democrats.com

David Swanson, co-founder of AfterDowningStreet.org

Dennis Kyne, Gulf War veteran, activist and author of "Support the Truth"

Dirk Adriaensens, coordinator SOS Iraq and member of the Executive Committee of the Brussells Tribunal, Belgium

Don DeBar, correspondent, WBAI, New York

Elizabeth Wrigley-Field, National Coordinating Committee - Campu Antiwar Network

Eric Ruder, reporter - Socialist Worker newspaper

Gabriele Zamparini, freelance journalist and film maker living in London; co-editor of www.thecatsdream.com

Howard Zinn, Ph.D., historian, playwright and activist; author of "A People's History of the United States" and co-editor with Anthony Arnove of "Voices of a People's History of the US"

Jacob Flowers, Director - MidSouth Peace and Justice Center

Judy Linehan, Military Families Speak Out

Jumpstart Ford Campaign, a joint effort of Global Exchange, the Rainforest Action Network and the Ruckus Society

Kären Ahern, Digging Deeper Media Collective, member VFP of Western Washington

Karen Burke, Campus Antiwar Movement to End the Occupation, Austin, TX

Karen Hadden, Seed Coalition, Austin, TX

Karen Parker, J.D., Pres. Association of Humanitarian Lawyers, UN non-governmental organization delegate.

Kathy Kelly, Nobel Peace Prize nominee, co-founder - Voices For Creative Non-Violence

Lindsey German, Convener - Stop the War Coalition (UK)

Michael Letwin, Co-Convener - New York City Labor Against the War

Mike Corwin, International Socialist Organization, Austin, TX

Mountain Forum for Peace, Nederland, CO Beth K. Lamont, Humanist Chaplain, NGO Rep. to the United Nations for the American Humanist Society.

Nick Mottern, National Director - Consumers for Peace

Nada Khader, Executive Director, Wespac Foundation

Norman Solomon, Author of "War Made Easy: How Presidents and Pundits Keep Spinning Us to Death"

Paola Pisi, professor of religious sciences (Italy) and editor of www.uruknet.info

Phil Gasper, Ph.D., Chair - Department of Philosophy & Religion, Notre Dame de Namur University, Professors for Peace

Sanford Russell, moderator of BoycottUS (Yahoo group)

Sharon Smith, author of "Women and Socialism : Essays on Women's Liberation"

Sonya Sofia, Rainbow organization

Stan Goff, Master Sergeant Retired, US Army

Sundiata Xian Tellem, Co-chair, Green Party of the United States Black Caucus; former chair, Green Party of Dallas County

Sunny Miller, Executive Director - Traprock Peace Center

Thomas F. Barton, publisher, GI Special

Tim Baer, Director - Bloomington Peace Action Coalition

Tim Carpenter, National Director - Progressive Democrats of America

Valley Reed, Chief organizer, March to Redeem Campaign

Ward Reilly, SE National Contact - Vietnam Veterans Against the War, Veterans for Peace, Baton Rouge


*Affiliations are for identification purposes only.


Page created by Charlie Jenks