grassrootspeace.org

November 5, 2007: This website is an archive of the former website, traprockpeace.org, which was created 10 years ago by Charles Jenks. It became one of the most populace sites in the US, and an important resource on the antiwar movement, student activism, 'depleted' uranium and other topics. Jenks authored virtually all of its web pages and multimedia content (photographs, audio, video, and pdf files. As the author and registered owner of that site, his purpose here is to preserve an important slice of the history of the grassroots peace movement in the US over the past decade. He is maintaining this historical archive as a service to the greater peace movement, and to the many friends of Traprock Peace Center. Blogs have been consolidated and the calendar has been archived for security reasons; all other links remain the same, and virtually all blog content remains intact.

THIS SITE NO LONGER REFLECTS THE CURRENT AND ONGOING WORK OF TRAPROCK PEACE CENTER, which has reorganized its board and moved to Greenfield, Mass. To contact Traprock Peace Center, call 413-773-7427 or visit its site. Charles Jenks is posting new material to PeaceJournal.org, a multimedia blog and resource center.

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War on Truth  From Warriors to Resisters
Books of the Month

The War on Truth

From Warriors to Resisters

Army of None

Iraq: the Logic of Withdrawal



More on this story below

World Depleted Uranium Centre, WODUC
Prof. Dr. A. Schott, Berlin

British Veteran Kenny Duncan First To Win War Pension Tribunal

Ladies and Gentlemen,

The Chromosome test, originated and paid by Prof. A. Schott, Head of WODUC, “helped to sway “(Kenny Duncan’s wife) the War Pensions Appeal Tribunal heard in Edinburgh, 2.2.04, that K. Duncan from Scotland has been poisoned by Depleted Uranium (DU) during the 1991 Gulf War. This Decision is a landmark in the struggle of the worldwide 66,000 DU contaminated veterans of the 1991 Gulf War (and the uncounted number of the 2003 Gulf War). K. Duncan served as tank transporter: Iraqi tanks, destroyed by DU Weapons, fired by British and US forces. So he inhaled the radiological and chemical poisonous DU dust. Uranium is an alpha-emitter. Alpha-radiation is known to make chromosome breaks. The tribunal realized that K. Duncan had been exposed to DU dust during his service in the 1991 Gulf War.

Mandy and Kenny Duncan have three children born after the 1991 war. All three are heavily congenital damaged. The sever health problems require weekly treatment and special school training. Their illnesses are attributable to genetic damage caused by DU.

The statement of NGVF-Association “... it must be noted that these tests had been paid for by the Charity.” (Press Release, 3rdFebruary 2004) is not correct. Details about DU you find in the WODUC-brochure “Fluch und Tragödie des Uran-Missbrauchs”, Berlin 2004.

Prof. Dr. A. Schott Head of WODUC  
E-Mail: albrecht_schott@arcor.de

http://www.woduc.de/ (in German)
http://www.woduc.de/ESPR-2003-200.pdf (English)


http://www.theherald.co.uk/news/9272.html

First award for depleted uranium poisoning claim

MARTIN WILLIAMS

A SCOTS ex-soldier has become the first veteran to win a pension appeal after being diagnosed with depleted uranium (DU) poisoning during the 1991 Gulf war.

A Pension Appeal Tribunal Service hearing in Edinburgh accepted medical evidence provided by Kenny Duncan, of Clackmannan, previously dismissed by the MoD, which revealed he had become ill after service in the Middle East.

Mr Duncan, 35, a driver with 7 Tank Transporter Regiment, helped move tanks destroyed by shells containing the poisonous dust.

He says he has evidence that his children's health problems are linked to his service. Kenneth, 10, Andrew, eight, and six-year-old Heather, have symptoms similar to those suffered by some Iraqi children, including deformed toes, and low immune systems making them susceptible to asthma, hay fever and eczema.

Mr Duncan has suffered increasing breathlessness and aching joints which he has linked to DU.

During the conflict, US and British troops fired an estimated 350 tonnes of DU weapons at Iraqi tanks.

Doctors in southern Iraq have reported a marked increase in cancers and birth defects, and suspicion has grown that they were caused by DU contamination from tank battles.

DU has been linked to a leukaemia cluster around the MoD range at Dundrennan, near the Solway Firth. Communities close to the range show the highest rate of childhood leukaemia in the UK.

Mr Duncan's appeal was launched after he was awarded only about £40 a week, half the full pension, when he retired from the Army through ill health in 1993 after nine years' service. His pension will now be reassessed.

The National Gulf Veterans and Families Association (NGVFA) said the tribunal decision added weight to its call for a full independent inquiry into Gulf war illnesses and supported its view that the government should do more financially to help the victims.

Mr Duncan's case relied on blood tests carried out by Dr Albrecht Schott, a German biochemist, which revealed chromosome aberrations caused by ionising radiation.

Dr Schott's research formed part of a study of 16 British veterans of conflicts in the Gulf, Bosnia, and Kosovo, which found that they had 14 times the usual level of chromosome abnormalities in their genes, raising fears that they will pass cancers and genetic illnesses to their offspring.

The test results were dismissed by the MoD as "neither well thought out nor scientifically sound."

Mr. Duncan said yesterday" "It is just a huge relief to have someone in authority say that you have been poisoned by this stuff and that you are not telling lies. It is now time for the MoD to tell us what went wrong.

"For all those veterans who have been going to the doctor with these ailments and are being told there is nothing wrong with them, this is for them, and I hope it will help them.

"I doubt that I will benefit much financially from this, but it wasn't abou the money, it was about the principle of the thing."

The ministry said yesterday: "Once we have seen the decision, we will consider the implications it might have on the MoD."

 

Page created February 12, 2004 by Charlie Jenks



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