US Troops Accused of raping and killing woman then killing her family

Traprock Homepage

(see also NY Times story below, with rape allegations in 9th paragraph.)

AP Report

http://www.boston.com/

BEIJI, Iraq –Five U.S. soldiers are being investigated for allegedly raping a young woman, then killing her and three relatives, an American military official said Friday, describing the latest allegations of abuse of Iraqi civilians.

The soldiers also allegedly burned the body of the woman they are accused of assaulting in the March incident, the official told The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the case.

The U.S. command issued a sparse statement, saying Maj. Gen. James D. Thurman, commander of coalition troops in Baghdad, had ordered a criminal investigation into the alleged killing of a family of four in Mahmoudiyah, south of Baghdad. The statement had no other details.

The case represents the latest allegations against U.S. soldiers stemming from the deaths of Iraqis. At least 14 U.S. troops have been convicted.

The United States also is investigating allegations that two dozen unarmed Iraqi civilians were killed by U.S. Marines in the western town of Haditha on Nov. 19 in a revenge attack after one of their own died in a roadside bombing.

“The entire investigation will encompass everything that could have happened that evening. We’re not releasing any specifics of an ongoing investigation,” military spokesman Maj. Todd Breasseale said of the Mahmoudiyah allegations.

“There is no indication what led soldiers to this home. The investigation just cracked open. We’re just beginning to dig into the details.”

Pentagon spokesman Bryan Whitman said he had no additional details on the incident but added that the military routinely investigates all allegations of misconduct.

However, a U.S. official close to the investigation said at least one of the soldiers, all assigned to the 502nd Infantry Regiment, has admitted his role and been arrested. Two soldiers from the same regiment were slain this month when they were kidnapped at a checkpoint near Youssifiyah.

The official told the AP the accused soldiers were from the same platoon as the two slain soldiers. The military has said one and possibly both of the slain soldiers were tortured and beheaded.

The official said the mutilation of the slain soldiers stirred feelings of guilt and led at least one of them to reveal the rape-slaying on June 22.

According to a senior Army official, the alleged incident was first revealed by a soldier during a routine counseling-type session. The official, who requested anonymity because the investigation is ongoing, said that soldier did not witness the incident but heard about it.

A second soldier, who also was not involved, said he overhead soldiers conspiring to commit the crimes, and then later saw bloodstains on their clothes, the official said.

He also said the four people killed included three adults and a child, and one of the adults was the woman who allegedly was raped.

One of the accused soldiers already has been discharged and is believed to be in the United States, several U.S. officials said on condition of anonymity because the investigation is ongoing. The others have had their weapons taken away and are confined to Forward Operating Base Mahmoudiyah.

Senior officers were aware of the family’s death but believed it was due to sectarian violence, common in the religiously mixed town, a U.S. official said.

The killings appeared to have been a “crime of opportunity,” the official said. The soldiers had not been attacked by insurgents but had noticed the woman on previous patrols.

——

AP correspondent Ryan Lenz is embedded with the 101st Airborne Division in Beiji, Iraq. He was previously embedded with the 502nd Infantry Regiment in Mahmoudiyah.

—-

The Associated Press News and Information Research Center and Lolita C. Baldor in Washington contributed to this report

_______________________________________
New York Times story (with rape and other specific allegations in 9th paragraph)

G.I.’s Face Inquiry on Killing of Iraqi Family

New York Times

By EDWARD WONG

Published: June 30, 2006

BAGHDAD, Iraq, June 30 — The United States military said Friday that it was investigating whether American soldiers had killed a family of four Iraqi civilians in March in their home south of Baghdad, adding another inquiry to a growing list of cases where Americans are accused of fatally shooting unarmed Iraqis.

The investigation is being overseen by the highest levels of the American command, and was ordered by the general commanding the Fourth Infantry Division, which is assigned to control the capital and areas immediately to the south, a military spokesman said.

The shooting incident took place March 12 in the volatile market town of Mahmudiya, an insurgent stronghold about 20 miles from Baghdad.

The deaths were originally attributed by the military to “insurgent activity,” American officials said in a written statement. That implies that soldiers involved in the incident may have misreported it to their commanders, or that there may have been a cover-up in the chain of command, as is suspected in the case of the Haditha killings last November.

The latest investigation began on June 24, one day after two soldiers “reported alleged coalition force involvement” in the deaths of the Iraqi family, the military said. A preliminary inquiry conducted after that report determined that there was enough evidence to start a full-scale criminal investigation, the military said.

“This is going to be a by-the-numbers, by-the-book investigation,” Maj. Todd Breasseale, the military spokesman, said in a telephone interview.

Reflecting the gravity of the possible crime, Major Breasseale said that Maj. Gen. James D. Thurman, commander of the Fourth Infantry Division, ordered the inquiry “the minute he got the news” of what his soldiers may have done. The major declined to give further details, and would not say how many soldiers are under investigation, or which specific unit they belong to.

The Associated Press reported today that the investigation involved five soldiers from a unit of the 502nd Infantry Regiment, which was attached to the Fourth Division command while operating in the area, though it is formally part of a different division, the 101st Airborne.

Early reports indicate that soldiers may have raped a woman, burned her body and killed the woman’s family, the news agency reported, citing an un named American official. The A.P. recently had a reporter embedded with the 502nd Infantry Regiment.

Earlier this month, two soldiers from the same unit were abducted while guarding a traffic control point in the town of Yusufiya, and were killed by insurgents. Their mutilated bodies were found along a booby-trapped road, after the American military deployed 8,000 American and Iraqi troops into the area in a search-and-rescue operation that was perhaps the largest of the war so far. A third soldier was killed in Yusufiya at the time of the ambush.

Though it appears the killing of the Iraqi family was unrelated to the Yusifya ambush, the March incident came to light when a soldier felt compelled to report it after the discovery of the bodies of his kidnapped comrades, the Associated Press reported. One soldier has been arrested, and four have had their weapons taken away and are confined to their base in Mahmudiya.

Both Mahmudiya and Yusufiya lie in the so-called Triangle of Death, an area of extreme hazard along the Euphrates River valley that has become a cauldron of insurgents, criminal gangs and lawless tribes. It was a munitions production base for Saddam Hussein’s government, and the home of senior Baath Party members, whose villas line the palm-fringed river banks.

The American military considers the area a crucial strategic approach to Baghdad, with important arteries running south to the holy city of Najaf and the oil center of Basra, but it has never been able to maintain any semblance of control in the region.

This latest investigation comes at a time of increasing scrutiny over the killings of civilians by American troops in Iraq. Nearly a half-dozen charges or investigations have been announced by the military in June alone.

The sudden flurry raises questions about whether American troops are facing increasing psychological duress as the war here grinds on, or perhaps whether the American military has been more keen, following the revelations surrounding Haditha, to make public its investigations into human rights abuses.

Many American troops here in Iraq are on their second or third tours. The Fourth Infantry Division, for instance, had already rotated once through Iraq, in the northern Sunni triangle, before taking control of the Baghdad area.

The incidents have taken place in areas where the Sunni-led insurgency is most virulent and where American troops have taken the most casualties, though commanders are quick to say that nothing excuses the egregious crimes that the soldiers and Marines in question are accused of committing.

The most prominent case involves an investigation into whether Marines executed as many as 24 unarmed Iraqi civilians in the western town of Haditha last November after a roadside bomb explosion killed a Marine. At the time, the American military put out a news release saying that 15 Iraqi civilians in the town had been killed by an insurgent bomb attack.

On June 1, as the political furor over Haditha was growing, Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri Kamal al-Maliki lashed out at the American military, saying that violence against Iraqi civilians by American troops was a “regular occurrence.”

“They crush them with their vehicles, and kill them just on suspicion,” he said at the time. “This is completely unacceptable.”

Major Breasseale said today that it was unclear when results from the Haditha investigation would be made public.

Earlier this month, the Army charged four American soldiers suspected of killing three detainees in Iraq and then threatening another American soldier with death if he reported the shootings.

Two days later, the Marine Corps said it had charged seven Marines and one Navy Corpsman with murder and kidnapping in the April killing of an Iraqi man in a village on the western outskirts of Baghdad. In that incident, the assailants are accused of planting a Kalashnikov rifle and shovel near the body of the victim, to make him appear to be an insurgent, after shooting him in the face four times.

As recently as last Sunday, the American military said two Pennsylvania National Guardsmen had been charged with involuntary manslaughter in the fatal shooting of an unarmed Iraqi man on Feb. 15.

The announcement of the latest investigation came as the military said today that three soldiers had been killed in separate combat incidents. One died Thursday night from a bomb explosion during a foot patrol south of Baghdad. Another was killed in an explosion while on patrol Thursday night near Balad, north of the capital. A soldier was also injured in that attack.

The third death occurred Thursday in the northern city of Mosul, when a soldier was killed by small arms fire.

At least 60 American troops died in Iraq in June, a decrease from 69 in May and 76 in April, but still almost twice as many as in March, one of the least deadly of the war for Americans. Until the sharp spike in April, American fatalities had been falling for about half a year. American commanders at the time attributed the decline to a shift in targets by the insurgents, attacking Iraqi civilians and security forces rather than Americans, and to the fact that American soldiers were leaving their bases less often on operations and patrols.

Lt. Col. Barry Johnson, a spokesman for the American command, said he saw no clear-cut reason for the rise in fatalities after March or the small drop in June. “We are not inclined to attribute the rise and fall in numbers to any particular factor,” he said. “Coalition forces remain a priority target for terrorists and insurgents, even though we’ve also seen a steady increase in attacks on civilians and Iraqi security forces as their primary targets.

“There are simply too many factors involved to draw broad conclusions based on numbers from one month to the next,” he added.

###

June 21 – Traprock Peace Action Report

Traprock Peace Center homepage
June 21,
First day of summer!
a worm has found
the new cabbage leaves.
I am late to the garden & prayers.
My sister survived the surgery—it went well.
Drive down the hill? Forgive me the engine.
So many earnest people hoping.

CONTENTS
1. Concern for Darfur & Sudan
2. Due: Comment on Impact of 20 more years?! Entergy Nuclear
3. Charlie Jenks on Student Rights, Friday Columbia U.
4. Occupied AFGHANISTAN: A Shotgun Marriage,
Recent images, Analysis, Discussion
Keith Harmon Snow, 6:30 Sunday, June 25
at the beautiful Quaker meeting house on Woolman Hill
5. Atomic Safety Hearing, Brattleboro, Mon/Tues. June 26 & 27
6. Welcome Emily West
7. July 4 – PEACE PICNIC at Traprock
2:30 – dark
8. Proposing PEACE WALKS, & FLOATS, for Hiroshima Days What suit you?

1. Friends, Is there oil in Darfur? We need to know.

That will help us understand whether we can trust our government to care about civilians in Darfur, as they have cared for civilians in Iraq, More than a million have died in Iraq through our policies, in a decade. The blood is on our hands, and healing awaits our action. I’m afraid it is easier to urge that distant villains be killed, in an unfamiliar country, than it is to see our own roles in cycles of violence. If there is oil in Sudan, we have reason to be very concerned.
I thank the groups hosting and sponsoring this meeting for doing so. I hope that before, during and after the meeting tonight (on June 21 in Northampton) we will all avail ourselves of crucial opportunities to assess any appeals for military intervention, whether spoken or unspoken, and take time to mount appeals for nonviolent interventions that are funded as fully as military ones. I hope we will take care to assure that no funds are forwarded to support violence.
There is no shortage of urgent need in the world, and for too many years
we have been dropping bombs that create desperate, deadly, and dreaded
situations. Thank you for helping to shine a light on Darfur, in a way that
may bring real aid, and not further slaughter for the sake of profits. We
intend to post a map Keith Harmon Snow has just provided indicating
tremendous oil reserves in Sudan. Please see his comments at
http://www.traprockpeace.org
Together may we unearth the roots that feed violence and domination.
Sunny Miller,
Traprock Peace Center
103A Keets Road
Deerfield, MA 01342

2. Comments due Friday, June 23 on Environmental Impacts.

Say what troubles you about 20 more years.
Comments are invited THIS week on the SCOPE of Environmental Impacts that should be considered regarding proposed extension of the license for New England’s oldest operating nuclear reactor, in Vernon Vermont. Entergy Nuclear proposes extending the Vermont Yankee license from 40 years to 60 years, (2012-2032). This antique reactor is juiced up and sputtering with an overdose of piping hot fuel, and no good place to put the remains for 10,000 generations. If you haven’t come out about this, now is a good time.
Celebrate the was you love summer by speaking up for our land, rivers, babies being born, and friends recovering from cancer. Richard Emch at the NRC invites your comments, preferred by this Friday, June 23 at . The NRC Office Public Affairs will have his number if you have questions. — 301 415-8200.

A. A U.S. court requires review of terror threats for nuclear reactors!
Acknowledging the possibility of attack, means that those harmful effects must be considered in decision making. On June 7 the NRC hurried to say they are considering appealing that. Notice they didn’t say they were considering complying with that. Thanks Harvey, Sally, for this reference:

http://today.reuters.com/news/ArticleInvesting.aspx?type=bondsNews&storyID=2
006-06-02T192033Z_01_N02196675_RTRIDST_0_UTILITIES-NRC-TERRORISM.XML
B. NRC Seeks Public Input on Environmental Review Associated with
Proposed Vermont Yankee Nuclear Plant License Extension
http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/news/2006/06-033i.html

3. Charlie Jenks, Traprock Peace Center Advisory Group Chair and web site manager will speak at Columbia University in NYC this Friday, June 23 on taking a stand for free speech on college campuses. His remarks are part of
a panel discussion with Elizabeth Wrigley-Field, a student activist at NYU, and Charles
Peterson, a student at Holyoke Community College..
This is one of many presentations at the conference, Socialism, 2006. While there
Charlie will tape many other speakers and put those resources on the Traprock web site.
Our congratulations to all who wrote and responded, achieving several successful interventions this year on behalf of free speech!

4. OCCUPIED Afghanistan: A Shotgun Wedding
Recent Images, Analysis, Discussion
a multimedia presentation, all welcome
Sunday, 25 June 2006, 6:30 _ 8:30 pm

Keith Harmon Snow, journalist, photographer, human rights investigator
and local farmer from Williamsburg shares news of life in a war zone,
women’s lives, heroin trade, terror & Afghan resistance.
http://www.allthingspass.com
Slides and music will show the beauty and sorrow of the land, the culture, and the people, amidst the ongoing U.S. war in Afghanistan. Topics to be introduced include the heroine trade, the position of women in society, the US role in “nation-building” and the “war on terror,” and the simple realities of life during wartime under the US occupation. Co-sponsored by Traprock Peace Center & Woolman Hill Conf. Center. Come on up. Woolman Hill is splendid in early summer and the restored Quaker meeting house makes is well suited to thoughtful reflection.
Free and open to the public. Wheelchair accessible.
Refreshments to follow. Donations welcome.

5. Atomic Safety Hearing, Brattleboro, Mo-Tues, June 26/27

ADVISOR AVAILABLE
NOPE, not waiting around for a melt-down!
Individuals will have an opportunity to offer comments on matters of concern related to the proceeding on Monday, June 26, and Tuesday, June 27. The remarks, which will be transcribed, will be received by the three-member ASLBP handling the hearing.
Known as _limited appearance statements,_ the comments will be accepted from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m., as needed, on June 26 at the Latchis Theatre, at 50 Main St. in Brattleboro, Vt. (Directions are available on the theatre_s web site at: http://www.latchis.com/location.html .) They will also be accepted at the same location from 9 a.m. to noon and from 1:30 to 4 p.m., as needed, on June 27.
_The purpose of the limited appearance statements is to allow members of the public to alert the Board and the parties to areas relating to the uprate and the admitted contentions in which evidence may need to be brought forward, and to assist the Board in its consideration of these issues.

Last week we wrote, inviting you to reserve time to speak by June 20. You may still be allowed to speak, on a time-available basis. We want to hear you. Requests can be e-mailed to: hearingdocket@nrc.gov; faxed to: (301) 415-1101; or mailed to: Office of the Secretary, Rulemakings and Adjudications Staff, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, D.C. 20555-0001. Copies of requests should be e-mailed to: jmr3@nrc.gov and ksv@nrc.gov .

6. Welcome to Emily West, just hired to help us manage the office and the information that flows through! I hope you’ll get to meet our new colleague soon. Watch for an introduction in our next newsletter. Your contribution helps us ‘keep up the good work!” I hope you can send a generous contribution soon, and that we’ll have more than temp help soon!

WE STILL HAVE AN OPENING FOR SUMMER INTERNS –
Heavy rains proved the roof is fixed!
Please inquire with the subject INTERN in the email heading:
traprock@crocker.com

7. July 4 — PEACE PICNIC

Tuesday, July 4, we congregate to celebrate our interdependence, and our freedoms to speak, work and live for peace and justice. Come when it suits you, from 2:30 ‘til dusk, when the fireflies rise.
This is an POT-LUCK picnic feast. Come meet your wonderful neighbors. We keep the food in the kitchen, and bring our plates out on the lawn. If it’s raining hard, or dreadfully hot, we fit inside—no problem.
This afternoon, special guests make brief comment, then we settle in for relaxed creativity, music and conversation. This year special guests will include author Danielle Trisoni. See the N.Y. Times review of her book, “Falling Through the Earth,” describing the relationship of daughter and her father, affected by the war in Vietnam. It’s a terrific book review.

Roy Morrison, author of Eco Civilization 2140, may also be able to come.
Please note: Last Saturday eight or nine Woolman Hill Board members came to look at our building in order to consider expanding their operations in this direction. This is, of course, unsettling, as their thinking is undecided. Who knows when we might have our last July 4 picnic here. Please come celebrate peace, and escape the rocket’s red glare, at the home Traprock has known since 1979. RSVP’s appreciated, but NOT necessary.
413 773-7427

DIRECTIONS: From Route 5 & 10 watch for blue state highway signs for
Woolman Hill Camp and Conference Center. Turn east up Keets Road. At the top
of the Hill, please drive slowly and make a hard left after the Woolman Hill sign. ***Sorry pet-lovers, Woolman Hill does not welcome pets.

8. Dear Friends, Shall we walk? Shall we float?

With help in the office, I feel ready to break away in the tradition of Granny D. Any chance you’d like to walk with us a bit between Saturday or Sunday July 29 or 30 and August 6, Hiroshima Day?
I wonder if a schedule like this would interest you.
Radiation How-to on Health Effects, Hindsdale, NH Sat. July 29 Radiation Monitoring, Northfield, Sunday, July 30 Songs for Survival, Greenfield, Mon. Aug. 1 A History of Nonviolence, Deerfield Tues. Aug 1 With All Due Respect—Wed.—A DAY on the CONNECTICUT RIVER UNDOING Uranium Weapons, Amherst Wide Angle Films 8/4 Lantern Floating and much more, Northampton, Saturday, August 5 The Nuclear Umbrella is Broken—Take it down in YOUR town, Aug. 6 Aug. 7 – southern MA friends have ideas ??
Aug. 8 – southern MA friends have ideas ??
Aug. 9 – conclusion at the border in Longmeadow, MA?
I am so delighted that Hattie Nestle has initiated a walk in Montpelier and northern Vermont on nuclear issues.
Best regards,
Sunny Miller
413-773-7427
Traprock Peace Center
103A Keets Road
Deerfield, MA 01342

http://www.traprockpeace.org
SUMMER IS FOR PEACE-MAKING
in a Neighbors’ Network to End War!

People of any age can name a

Traprock Peace Action Report – June, 2006

Traprock Peace Center homepage

June 17, 2006 —
The garden is blooming, as if
Ready for weddings, recovery, or funerals.
We don’t KNOW we’ll have another day with
Honey suckle as fragrant as peaches.
Downtown,
So many earnest people honking
Beep, BEEP-Beep — a joyfully insistent symphony.*
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
http://www.traprockpeace.org

CONTENTS

1. So many people …*
2. Wide Angle Films series began Friday, in Amherst
3. Fathers’ Day Walk to Entergy Nuclear! Sunday/STRAWBERRIES
4. PEACE with IRAN: a Round-table discussion, Tues. June 20
5. International Day of Peace & Prayer, Wed. June 21, Leverett
with local history, and the film, “Sacred Run”
6. OCCUPIED AFGHANISTAN, Recent images, Analysis, Discussion
Keith Harmon Snow, 6:30 Sunday, June 25
at the restored meeting house on Woolman Hill
7. Atomic Safety Hearing, Brattleboro, Mon/Tues. June 26 & 27
Ask a neighbor
8. WISH list: Wheels, gardening, proof-reading, ___
9. OPENING for SUMMER INTERNS
10. July 4 – PEACE PICNIC at Traprock
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

1. So many people …

Yesterday four neighbors stood with signs in Greenfield, “Honk for Peace,”
“2500++++” and “Spare the Innocents.” The number of people honking, giving a
thumbs up, flashing a peace sign or waving was very encouraging — about 250
people made a response showing their support during just an hour on the
street at lunch time. So many people want the violence to stop!

After an hour we went to visit the Air Force Recruiting Station right
behind us at 91 Main Street, and had a long chat with Sgt. Meeks. Nick
Mottern, a Vietnam vet was with us and asked lots of thoughtful questions.

There, and at the news offices of The Republican and The Recorder, we
lamented all the deaths. (Lancet Journal of Medicine) Annie Hassett says
the Recorder ran a photo. ‘Seems like small is beautiful. Please believe in
yourself, however small you might feel when you witness the attempts to
repress our rights. We can demonstrate with anywhere, anytime, and our
messages might catch on. See you on the streets!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

2. Wide Angle Films Series began Friday, in Amherst, 7pm
“The Revolution will not be Televised”

A new series in Amherst got off to a great start last night. It’s hosted
at the Nacul Center, 592 Main Street, a few blocks east of the Amherst Town
Hall and the Police Station, at the corner of N. Whitney and Main Street. A
complete description of the Wide Angle Films summer series is at

http://justiceandpeace.net/
Click on “Wide Angle Films” for descriptions of the films,
more complete than was possible on the printed flyers.
This series is cosponsored by SAGE, the AFSC, and Traprock.
Many thanks to the planning committee putting this together.
For distribution of this film, exposing the collusion of corperate media
info@deckert-distribution.com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

3. Father’s and Other’s Day, WALK * RALLY, June 18

At 12:00 Brattleboro Common, in VT, we hope to bring some strawberries
and strawberry fruit smoothies to celebrate all the Dads and others working
for safety and no melt down at the Vernon reactor! Save some for the walkers
— YUM!

If you like, walk with us north on Rt 5, 3.5 miles to Entergy
Headquarters on Old Ferry Road. You may want to bring signs, water, walking
shoes and positive thinking!! Donations, songs, your comments always
welcome. Don’t evacuate … CONGREGATE!

~2 pm Entergy Nuclear Headquarters, Old Ferry Rd, Brattleboro, VT

Can’t walk? Not a problem! Perhaps you can help shuttle walkers back to
their cars. Come take a stand at the Common or at Entergy Headquarters on
Old Ferry Road. DIRECTIONS: The Brattleboro Common is north from Main
Street. Past the fountain, triangle and courthouse, look for the Gazebo and
the long grassy lawn, with plenty of shade, beside Route 5.
From US 91, take exit three and travel north and east from the small rotary.

~~~ GOOD NEWS FROM THE COURTS!

A U.S. court backs review of terror threats for nuclear reactors.
Acknowledging the possibility of attack, means that those harmful effects
must be considered in decision making. On June 7 the NRC hurried to say they
are considering appealing that. Notice they didn’t say they wer considering
complying with that. Thanks Harvey, Sally for this reference:

http://today.reuters.com/news/ArticleInvesting.aspx?type=bondsNews&storyID=2
006-06-02T192033Z_01_N02196675_RTRIDST_0_UTILITIES-NRC-TERRORISM.XML

~~~ WHAT SHOULD BE RECONSIDERED?

Comments are invited THIS week on the SCOPE of Environmental Impacts that
should be considered regarding proposed extension of the license for New
England’s oldest operating nuclear reactor, from 40 years to 60 years. This
antique car is juiced up and sputtering with an overdose of piping hot fuel.
If you haven’t come out about this, now is a good time.

Ask for Richard Emch at the NRC. The NRC Office Public Affairs will have his
number — 301 415-8200.

NRC Seeks Public Input on Environmental Review Associated with Proposed
Vermont Yankee Nuclear Plant License Extension
http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/news/2006/06-033i.html

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

4. June 20, Peace with Iran! A Round-table discussion
at Traprock, 7pm

Iranian neighbors, representatives of area peace groups and Traprock
supporters are invited to a round-table discussion on peace with Iran. To
make this simple, we’ll hold this first discussion at Traprock. Find points
of agreement and build understanding that can strengthen resistance to
proposals for war. We seek possibilities.

Suggestions to be discussed can include showing Iranian films, having an
Iranian/US soccer event that includes children and youths who are soccer
fans, and even participating in an ENCAMPMENT in DC this fall with the
theme, “Enough is Enough!” Grassroots organizing and national conference
calls are underway.

Please bring your hopes to the table.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

5. INTERNATIONAL DAY OF PEACE AND PRAYER
Observed in Leverett at Mt. Toby Friends Meeting House

In 1996, Oglala Chief Arvol Looking Horse, Holder of the Sacred Pipe,
declared June 21st, (Summer Solstice) an International Day of Peace and
Prayer. A call for unity among earth’s people’s with a vision of peace.
Peace and Prayer Day is rooted in traditional indian culture, led by a
native elder but open to prayers from all faith traditions.

This year Jill Eldridge and Elliot Tarry are including a documentary
film, “The Sacred Run” by Andrea Sadler. The film records a 4,000 Km run
down the coast of Japan by American Indian Movement, A.I.M founder Dennis
Banks. Banks’ run ends with stops at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Thus the
intention of this year’s event includes a message of non-proliferation of
nuclear weapons. Friends from the Peace Pagada will be on hand to add their
prayers.

Llan Starkwaether will present a power point photo essay on the history
of the land under the Mt. Toby Meeting house based on his recent book on how
the railroad changed the local landscape. Please note that this is not a
Quaker meeting program. We have rented the meeting house from 9am-3pm so
there is shelter then, if needed. Please bring food to share at any time
and share your thoughts when we pass the talking stick.

Schedule:

Sunrise: Opening ceremony/ Lighting of the Sacred Fire/ Calling the
Directions? Prayers for peace
9:30 am: Llan Starkweather presentation
10 am: Film “The Sacred Run”
Noon: Main Ceremony, take lunch break
1pm: Llan Starkweather local history
1:45 pm: Film “the Sacred Run”
Sunset: Closing Ceremony

For more information please call Elliot Tarry, 917 549-8329.
Peace groups are invited to co-sponsor. Hope you can help.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

6. Occupied Afghanistan: A Shotgun Wedding
Recent Images, Analysis, Discussion

a multimedia presentation, all welcome
Sunday, 25 June 2006, 6:30 – 8:30 pm

Keith Harmon Snow, journalist, photographer, human rights investigator
and local farmer from Williamsburg shares news of life in a war zone,
women’s lives, heroin trade, terror & Afghan resistance.
http://www.allthingspass.com

Slides and music will show the beauty and sorrow of the land, the
culture, and the people, amidst the ongoing U.S. war in Afghanistan.
Topics to be introduced include the heroine trade, the position of
women in society, the US role in “nation-building” and the “war on terror,”
and the simple realities of life during wartime under the US occupation.
Co-sponsored by Traprock Peace Center & Woolman Hill Conf. Center.
Come on up. Woolman Hill is splendid in early summer and the restored Quaker
meeting house makes is well suited to thoughtful reflection.

Free and open to the public. Wheelchair accessible.
Refreshments to follow. Donations welcome.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

7. Atomic Safety Hearing, Brattleboro, Mo-Tues, June 26/27

ADVISOR AVAILABLE
NOPE, not waiting around for a melt-down!

Our friends at the New England Coalition are looking for 10-20 intelligent,
articulate people to sign up to speak at the Atomic Safety Licensing Board,
(ASLB) hearing June 26-27. (Known as “limited appearance statements,” the
comments will be accepted from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m., as needed, on June 26 at
the Latchis Theatre, at 50 Main St. in Brattleboro, Vt. They will also be
accepted at the same location from 9 a.m. to noon and from 1:30 to 4 p.m.,
as needed, on June 27).

Ray has offered to help with content–we all have a lot to say, and (or but)
there are specific points which must be made to the ASLB at this hearing.
The ASLB recently rejected 3 of NEC’s late-filed contentions, not on their
merits, but on procedural grounds. This is another opportunity to get these
concerns on the record. I am especially calling on those of you who have
spoken out in the past and have knowledge of the issues to help out if you
can, by replying to this email and working with Ray to make sure we get the
bases covered. Please mark your calendars for the 26 & 27 of June, and get
in touch with Ray at shadis@prexar.com if you can help. And don’t forget to
sign up to speak. Details for signing up are below.

Persons wishing to make an oral statement who have submitted a timely
written request to do so will be given priority when it comes to the
speaking order at the sessions. To be considered timely, a written request
must either be e-mailed, faxed or sent by regular mail so as to be received
by 5 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, June 20. Requests can be e-mailed to:
hearingdocket@nrc.gov; faxed to: (301) 415-1101; or mailed to: Office of the
Secretary, Rulemakings and Adjudications Staff, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory
Commission, Washington, D.C. 20555-0001. Copies of requests should be
e-mailed to: jmr3@nrc.gov and ksv@nrc.gov; .

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8. OPENING FOR SUMMER INTERNS –

Heavy rains prove the roof is fixed!

Sarah Whilton of Maryland is planning to come study uranium weapons with us
in August. Any other folks interested, please apply for residential
internship by sending 2 employee references and 2 household references.
These don’t need to be long — just a clue to show what tried and true help
you are. Include a phone number for your references.

We have one double-sized room and one standard bedroom available
upstairs, with an usptairs shower. Garden space and hiking trails grace life
on the Hill (for those who have time!) We ask for fifteen hours per week on
a mix of program, office, maintenance and fund-raising projects, and your
leadership for some additional peace-making. Interns can easily work 20
hours/week off the Hill for income, and keep their federal tax burden light.
Please inquire with the subject INTERN in the email heading:
traprock@crocker.com

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9. WISH LIST –

A. WHEELS: Contributions are tax deductible.

Years ago when Jonah Kaplan Woolner was volunteering at age 13, he said
we should be out and about with a peace bus. If you have a spare car, van or
camper, and want to give less support to a brutal federal government, please
consider making a contribution on wheels.

MMMM; Today eight or so Woolman Hill Board members came to look at our
building in order to consider expanding their operations in this direction.
This is, of course, unsettling. We wonder what could happen. Name Traprock
in a will so that we might feel more settled? Other possibilities?

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C. WISH LIST: POSITIONS for VOLUNTEERS
… HONK for PEACE and then some!

a. Green thumb: gardening help in the perennial flower bed;
Japanese iris, lupines and lillies are almost done blooming.
The grasses in between are blooming, too!

b. Help prepare a newsletter?
proof-reading, folding, stamping needed.

c. BABY TEETH NEEDED: In Southwestern NH, southern VT, and northern MA,
we want to know how much strontium 90 may have been absorbed by young
children. Can you help distribute forms parents before school is our, so
that they can donate a baby tooth? See more about strontium 90 at
http://www.radiation.org (weekdays or week-ends.) Further health studies in
this vicinity are proposed.

d. July 4 Picnic is being planned. Join Sally Weiss, Mark and Sue
Watkins, Sunny, welcoming our neighbors, from 2:30 til dusk, when the
fireflies rise.

Thanks to John Howard for regular help on Fridays with all sorts of
improvements, from radiation monitoring on site, to building a new set of
shelves for the video players!

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10. July 4 — PEACE PICNIC

Tuesday, July 4, we congregate to celebrate our interdependence, and our
freedoms to speak, work and live for peace and justice. Come when it suits
you, from 2:30 til dusk, when the fireflies rise.

This is an POT-LUCK picnic feast, usually attended by 60+ folks. Come
meet your wonderful neighbors. We keep the food in the kitchen, and bring
our plates out on the lawn. (If it’s raining hard, or dreadfully hot, fewer
people come and we fit inside with no problem.)

This year special guests will include author Danielle Trisoni. See the
N.Y. Times review of her book, “Falling Through the Earth,” describing the
relationship of daughter and her father, affected by the war in Vietnam,
It’s a terrific book review.

Who knows when we might have our last July 4 picnic together. Please
come! RSVP’s appreciated, but NOT necessary. Friends and family may
enjoy a day of inter-generational friendship, music making, theater games,
and creative peace-making. Ray Paquette has brought some give-aways,
including many shoes. I’m going to get out some clay.

DIRECTIONS: From Route 5 & 10 watch for blue state highway signs for
Woolman Hill Camp and Conference Center. Turn east up Keets Road. At the top
of the Hill, please drive slowly and make a hard left after the Woolman Hill
sign. ***Sorry pet-lovers, Woolman Hill does not welcome pets.

Best regards,
Sunny Miller
413-773-7427
Traprock Peace Center
103A Keets Road
Deerfield, MA 01342
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3000+ visitors daily, thanks to your visits, referrals and
contributions!

Traprock Peace Center homepage

SUMMER IS FOR PEACE-MAKING
in a Neighbors’ Network to End War