grassrootspeace.org

November 5, 2007: This website is an archive of the former website, traprockpeace.org, which was created 10 years ago by Charles Jenks. It became one of the most populace sites in the US, and an important resource on the antiwar movement, student activism, 'depleted' uranium and other topics. Jenks authored virtually all of its web pages and multimedia content (photographs, audio, video, and pdf files. As the author and registered owner of that site, his purpose here is to preserve an important slice of the history of the grassroots peace movement in the US over the past decade. He is maintaining this historical archive as a service to the greater peace movement, and to the many friends of Traprock Peace Center. Blogs have been consolidated and the calendar has been archived for security reasons; all other links remain the same, and virtually all blog content remains intact.

THIS SITE NO LONGER REFLECTS THE CURRENT AND ONGOING WORK OF TRAPROCK PEACE CENTER, which has reorganized its board and moved to Greenfield, Mass. To contact Traprock Peace Center, call 413-773-7427 or visit its site. Charles Jenks is posting new material to PeaceJournal.org, a multimedia blog and resource center.

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Contents - Archives - War Crimes - GI Special - Student Activism - Links

War on Truth  From Warriors to Resisters
Books of the Month

The War on Truth

From Warriors to Resisters

Army of None

Iraq: the Logic of Withdrawal

Interview with Glen Milner
Ground Zero Center for Nonviolent Action, Poulsbo, WA

Glen Milner has worked on Trident nuclear submarine issues with the Ground Zero Center for Nonviolent Action, www. in Poulsbo, WA since the early 1980's. Milner is an electrician who has devoted time to extensive research using the Freedom of Information Act, since 1987.

The fact that the Navy has been firing uranium munitions off the Washington coast was discovered in documents Milner received from the Navy regarding navigation hazards for Trident submarines. The submarines were advised to stay out of an area where a surface ship was firing 20-mm bullets containg this heavy metal, radioactive waste. Milner was a key figure in breaking the story in January 2003 in many news outlets.

Currently the Ground Zero group is involved in an environmental lawsuit against the Navy's Trident II (D-5) missile upgrade at the Bangor submarine base. The lawsuit is based almost entirely upon information released through the Freedom of Information Act.

In a Traprock Peace Center interview on October 5, Milner gives a broad overview of the information he has found, and the problems he hopes the public will address, including:

1. The US Navy does not provide medical monitoring for uranium contamination for sailors,

2. The Navy does no tracking, and apparently no record keeping concerning the areas where uranium-waste munitions are fired,

3. Prime fishing areas and several endangered species are likely being affected by affected by sea water deteriorating the fired uranium shells, but he is aware of no adequate research regarding the affects on marine mammals, fish and smaller sea creatures,

4. An exemption granted by the Department of Transportation exempts the military from labeling shipments of uranium munitions, "radioactive." Currently the only warning is "explosive." On August ll, 1986 the US Army letter appealing for an exemption said avoiding public alarm was the reason an exemption should be granted. That exemption number 9649 is due for renewed by June 30, 2004,

5. Storage facilities and transportation routes are sites where first responders to fires won't know they are breathing in radioactive, heavy metals,

6. The Navy shipped the Coast Guard uranium munitions, even though the Coast Guard has no permit from the NRC to handle these materials,

7. There are 1760 nuclear warheads stored just 15 miles from Seattle,

8. The NRC is supposed to be contacted if as few as 42 uranium-waste bullets are lost. The Navy purchased approximately 20 million rounds of the 20 mm DU bullets. How will the Navy know when 40 rounds are lost if they keep no records.

 

Page created October 10, 2003 by Charlie Jenks

 



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