grassrootspeace.org

November 5, 2007: This website is an archive of the former website, traprockpeace.org, which was created 10 years ago by Charles Jenks. It became one of the most populace sites in the US, and an important resource on the antiwar movement, student activism, 'depleted' uranium and other topics. Jenks authored virtually all of its web pages and multimedia content (photographs, audio, video, and pdf files. As the author and registered owner of that site, his purpose here is to preserve an important slice of the history of the grassroots peace movement in the US over the past decade. He is maintaining this historical archive as a service to the greater peace movement, and to the many friends of Traprock Peace Center. Blogs have been consolidated and the calendar has been archived for security reasons; all other links remain the same, and virtually all blog content remains intact.

THIS SITE NO LONGER REFLECTS THE CURRENT AND ONGOING WORK OF TRAPROCK PEACE CENTER, which has reorganized its board and moved to Greenfield, Mass. To contact Traprock Peace Center, call 413-773-7427 or visit its site. Charles Jenks is posting new material to PeaceJournal.org, a multimedia blog and resource center.

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Contents - Archives - War Crimes - GI Special - Student Activism - Links

War on Truth  From Warriors to Resisters
Books of the Month

The War on Truth

From Warriors to Resisters

Army of None

Iraq: the Logic of Withdrawal

See Press Release (pdf file) and Action Plan (pdf file)
See Dec. 4 Seattle Post-Intelligencer story

See DOT-E 9649 8th rev. authorizing transportation in commerce of DU munitions

DOES YOUR FIRE CHIEF ACCEPT THE OBFUSCATION ABOUT DU?

Subject: DU shipments-size

Below are the limits on size of shipments according to an Army Materials License from 2002.

One fact--in an Army Materials License dated November 30, 2002--it gives a hint or at least a limit to the size of a DU shipment. Section 2-5 states that

Rail shipments could haul as much as 40,000 lbs. of DU Road transport vehicles as much as 15,000 lbs. of DU Ocean vessel as much as 300,000 to 900,000 lbs. of DU

We assume this is for the total shipment (DU plus the cartridge).

It's likely that unleashing tons of Uranium weapons in Iraq this year adds considerable shipping traffic and facilities are restocked. I (Sunny) expect that rail lines or roads leading to Westover AFB (Westerm Massacusetts), for example, see this traffic. And of course the huge cargo planes that supply the Middle East are likely to carry tons of uranium weapons.

We make the claim, by the way, that the DOD is trying to keep these shipments a secret. You are seeing that. I (Glen) have had a very difficult time getting information.

We could take the amount of DU spent in Iraq this year, calculate the actual weight of the cartridges spent, divide by 15,000 lbs., multiply by two (the shipment would probably go to an ammo depot and then to a final destination) for a guess of the number of shipments in 2002. In reality, it is probably shipped all over, as it is 'needed' in various locations. If we estimate the number of shipments, perhaps then the DOD would respond.

Also--just came across a list of bulk storage depots--10 are listed that can store a maximum of 10 million kilograms of DU. See summary below. Please forward to interested colleagues.

a. Anniston Army Depot, Anniston, AL
b. Bluegrass Army Depot, Richmond, KY
c. Crane Army Activity, Crane, IN
d. Hawthorne Army Depot, Hawthorne, NV
e. Letterkenny Army Depot, Chambersburg, PA f. McAlester Army Ammunition Plant, McAlester, OK
g. Red River Army Depot, Texarkana, TX
h. Seneca Army Depot, Romulus, NY
i. Sierra Army Depot, Herlong, CA
j. Tooele Army Depot, Tooele, UT

Glen Milner http://www.gzcenter.org

Sunny Miller http://www.grassrootspeace.org


DU Storage Facilities and Shipment Size Limits

The Department of the Army’s Nuclear Regulatory Commission Materials License dated December 24, 1997 (expired on November 30, 2002) discusses DU storage facilities and shipment size limits.

Bulk Storage

Section 2-2, paragraph 2.1.4 states:

There are two categories of storage covered by this application: bulk storage and non-bulk storage. Bulk storage represents long-term storage of large amounts of ammunition. Bulk storage installations can store a maximum of 10 million kilograms of DU. Authorized bulk storage installations are listed below:

a. Anniston Army Depot, Anniston, AL
b. Bluegrass Army Depot, Richmond, KY
c. Crane Army Activity, Crane, IN
d. Hawthorne Army Depot, Hawthorne, NV
e. Letterkenny Army Depot, Chambersburg, PA
f. McAlester Army Ammunition Plant, McAlester, OK
g. Red River Army Depot, Texarkana, TX
h. Seneca Army Depot, Romulus, NY
i. Sierra Army Depot, Herlong, CA
j. Tooele Army Depot, Tooele, UT

(Note that 10 million kilograms is over 11,000 tons.)

Non-bulk Storage

Section 2-3, paragraph 2.1.5 states:

Non-bulk storage covers any Army installation that has a requirement to store lesser amounts of DU ammunition in support of military operations. Non-bulk storage installations can store a maximum of 50,000 kilograms of DU. Although not considered an all-inclusive list, typical examples would be installations that store DU ammunition in support of deployment, retrograde, shipment consolidation, or repair of military vehicles. Storage of DU ammunition under this category can range from a few days to long term.

Shipment Size Limits

Section 2-5, paragraph 3.2 states:

Transportation: The anticipated quantity of DU in a single road or rail-transport vehicle is based upon the gross weight limitation imposed on the vehicle. Rail transport vehicles could contain as much as 40,000 pounds of DU, while road transport vehicles could contain up to 15,000 pounds of DU. Typical peacetime shipments of DU ammunition by an ocean vessel could involve between 300,000 and 900,000 pounds of DU.

Page created December 6, 2003 by Charlie Jenks

 



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